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Kinesiology

Bachelor of Arts in Kinesiology

Kinesiology is a human service major that trains individuals to help others enhance the quality of their lives through a balance of physical activity and other areas of wellness. Professionals in the field are able to design and implement physical activity programs that are safe, effective, developmentally appropriate, enjoyable, and inclusive of people of varied interests and physical characteristics. The curriculum in kinesiology can be tailored to individual student interests, although in general, it prepares students for careers related to physical activity, fitness, and sport, and provides a broad exposure to the liberal arts. Graduates pursue careers as physical education teachers, health-fitness instructors, personal trainers and exercise leaders, recreation directors, athletic coaches, and athletic administrators or cross over into areas related to sport and recreation management. Kinesiology also is excellent preparation for professional certification programs in fields such as athletic training, massage therapy, personal training, and strength and conditioning. Students interested in physical education teacher certification should also consult the Education section of the catalog. 

The following are expectations of all graduates of the Kinesiology Program:

  • Understand, evaluate and apply ethical principles (particularly an ethic of care) in sport and movement contexts.
  • Demonstrate the ability to create, lead or facilitate a variety of movement activities for a variety
    of participants.
  • Understand and facilitate the practice of moving with bodily or kinesthetic awareness.
  • Understand, articulate and apply mechanical principles to the instruction of safe and efficient movement and the prevention of injury.
  • Understand, articulate and apply anatomical and physiological principles to the instruction of safe and efficient movement and the prevention of injury.
  • Understand, articulate and apply the psychological principles that inform health-supportive and effective movement practices, including the “positive coaching” of sports.
  • Understand, articulate, experience and apply the basic principles of health-related fitness.
  • Understand, articulate and analyze the sociological connections between sport and various societies in the US and around the world.
  • Understand and articulate the needs of varied populations with physical and mental challenges, and evaluate and create modified programs in sport and physical activity.

Each Kinesiology Major will demonstrate the acquisition of the following skills:

  • The ability and inclination to read with an inquiring and imaginative mind.
  • The ability to speak and write in an informed, precise and assertive fashion.
  • The ability to think critically and imaginatively.
  • The ability to work collaboratively and independently.
  • The ability to lead oneself and others in a responsible, purposeful and ethical fashion.
  • The ability to practice movement instruction/leadership in an informed and reflective manner. 

Requirements to Major in Kinesiology (58 Credits)

Students majoring in kinesiology must earn a C- or better in all courses required in the major. It is strongly recommended that kinesiology majors choose an advisor in the kinesiology department by the end of their first year. All kinesiology majors must complete the kinesiology core courses listed below, and then select and complete a specific concentration. A practicum is required, and each student is strongly encouraged to select a practicum experience in an area of interest toward a potential future career goal.

A. Kinesiology Core Courses (44-45 Credits)

  • BI 1030 – Concepts of Human Anatomy and Physiology
  • KI 1110 – Introduction to Kinesiology
  • KI 2020 – Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) for the Professional Rescuer (1cr)
  • KI 2114 – Movement Instruction: Team Sports (2cr)
  • KI 2116 – Movement Instruction: Fitness Activities (2cr)
  • KI 2118 – Movement Instruction: Lifetime Activities (2cr)
  • KI /SM 2130 (PS 2230) – Psychology of Sport and Movement
  • KI 2140 – Motor Behavior (2cr)
  • KI 2150 – Fitness/Nutrition for Wellness
  • KI 3180 – Biomechanics
  • KI 3190 – Adaptive Physical Activity
  • KI/SM 3120 – Sport in the Global Society
  • KI 4000 – Senior Seminar in Kinesiology (2cr)
  • KI 4410 – Exercise Physiology
  • KI 4850 – Practicum in Kinesiology (1-4cr)

Concentrations – All Kinesiology Majors choose one of the following concentrations:

Coaching Education Concentration (14 Credits)

  • KI 2110 – Basic Care and Prevention of Injuries
  • KI 3720 – Coaching Education Seminar

Choose 6 credits from the following:

  • KI 1170 – Positive Coaching of Youth Sports
  • KI 3140 – Sports Nutrition (2cr)
  • KI 3990 – Topics in Kinesiology (1-4cr; offered upon sufficient demand)
  • KI/SM 4710 – Legal Issues in Sport and Recreation

Fitness Leadership Concentration (14 Credits)

  • KI 2110 – Basic Care and Prevention of Injuries
  • KI 3150 – Fitness Programming and Assessment (2cr)

Choose 8 credits from the following:

  • BI 1020 – Foundations of Nutrition
  • KI 1190 – Energy Exercises and Therapies (2cr)
  • KI 2112 – Creative Movement Instruction: Rhythms and Gymnastics (2cr)
  • KI 2120 – Stress Management
  • KI 3140 – Sports Nutrition (2cr)
  • KI/SM 4710 – Legal Issues in Sport and Recreation
  • KI 3990 – Topics in Kinesiology (1-4cr; offered upon sufficient demand)

Physical Education Certification Concentration

**See the Education section of Catalog for additional specific courses required to seek certification in Physical Education. Physical Education course descriptions listed after Kinesiology courses.

C. Electives

Kinesiology majors are encouraged to consult with their advisor and to select from

the following electives to complement their required courses, depending on individual career goals
and interests:

  • BI 1020 – Foundations of Nutrition
  • CO 1050 – Introduction to Sport Communication
  • CO 4050 – Sport Rhetoric
  • KI 1190 – Energy Exercises and Therapies (2cr)
  • KI/SM 1510 – Introduction to Sport and Recreation Management
  • KI 1170 – Positive Coaching of Youth Sports (2cr)
  • KI2010 – First Aid/CPR/AED
  • KI 2110 – Basic Care and Prevention of Injuries
  • KI 2112 – Creative Movement Instruction: Rhythms and Gymnastics (2cr)
  • KI 2120 – Stress Management
  • KI 3140 – Sports Nutrition (2cr)
  • KI 3510 – World Medicine
  • OL 1110 – Introduction to Outdoor Leadership
  • OL 2430 – Wilderness First Responder
  • OL/KI/SM 3610 – Theory of Outdoor Leadership
  • OL 3710 – Experiential Learning: Dewey to Outward Bound
  • KI/SM 2750 – Organization and Administration of Sport and Recreation
  • OL 3870 – Outdoor and Adventure Operations and Management
  • KI 3990 – Topics in Kinesiology (1-4cr)
  • KI/SM 4710 – Legal Issues in Sport and Recreation
  • KI 4810 – Directed Study in Kinesiology (1-4cr)
  • KI 4830 – Independent Study in Kinesiology (1-4cr)
  • KI 4910 – Internship in Kinesiology (1-15cr)

D. General Education Courses

**See the General Education section of the Catalog for specifics on the required courses.

Requirements to Minor in Coaching (20-23 Credits)

*Kinesiology majors cannot minor in coaching.

Minimum requirements to complete a minor in Coaching include:

  • KI 2020 – Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation for the Professional Rescuer (1cr)
  • KI 2110 – Basic Care and Prevention of Injuries
  • KI 2150 – Fitness/Nutrition for Wellness
  • KI 2114 – Movement Instruction: Team Sports (2cr)
  • or KI 2116 – Movement Instruction: Fitness Activities (2cr)
  • KI 3720 – Coaching Education Seminar
  • KI/SM 4710 – Legal Issues in Sport and Recreation

Choose one of the following:

  • KI /SM 2130 (PS 2230) – Psychology of Sport and Movement
  • KI/SM 3120 – Sport in the Global Society
  • KI 4850 – Practicum in Kinesiology (1-4cr) *Students select an appropriate setting specific to coaching.

Requirements to Minor in Wellness (24 Credits)

  • BI 1030 – Concepts of Human Anatomy and Physiology
  • or BI 2030 and BI 2040 if a student has already taken these in her/his major
  • KI 3510 – World Medicine
  • PS 1110 – Introduction to Psychology
  • PS 4250 – Health Psychology

Choose one elective from the following:

  • KI 2120 – Stress Management
  • KI 2150 – Fitness/Nutrition for Wellness

Choose 4 credits from the following:

  • BI 1020 – Foundations of Nutrition
  • CO 2020 – Interpersonal Communication
  • KI 1190 – Energy Exercises and Therapies (2cr)
  • PS 2210 – Human Sexuality
  • SO 3100 – Health and Society
  • KI 3990 – Topics in Kinesiology (1-4cr)

Course Descriptions

**All undergraduate courses are 4 credits unless otherwise noted. 

KI 1110 Introduction to Kinesiology

This foundation level course introduces the student to the various sub-disciplines and professions in kinesiology, exercise, sport science, and physical education, and explores introductory content from the science, historical, philosophical, physiological, psychological, sociological, and ethical perspectives of the profession. The course will also survey the current issues, challenges, and trends, such as childhood obesity, that professionals in kinesiology and related fields address in today’s society. Students will also participate in activities used to illustrate a basic knowledge of kinesiological anatomy. Recommended to be taken in the first year by students in the major. Offered every fall. 

KI 1170 Positive Coaching of Youth Sports

This introductory level course presents aspects of coaching pertinent to today’s youth coach and the youth coaches of the future. Emphasis is placed on positive leadership in three critical areas; 1) character building and sportsmanship, 2) the physical, social, and emotional capacities and limitations of the specific age group, and 3) coaching principles and philosophies as well as the rules and strategies of the sport. Positive Coaching promotes the value and importance of sports and physical activities in the emotional, physical, social, and mental development of youth through participation, which is meant to develop important character traits and social skills for every child involved. This can be done only if the adults involved have proper training and information. Throughout the course, students will examine the ideas behind positive coaching, introduce coaching ideas into real-life situations, and reflect on personal sport and coach experiences.

KI 1190 Energy Exercises and Therapies

Exploration of the practice and theory of two different kinds of Eastern energy-based, gentle movement and energy-balancing systems as well as some training in the practice and philosophy of meditation. It includes a foundation in Eastern spiritual philosophies as they relate to yoga, meditation, well-being and everyday living, as well as brief exploration of energy anatomy and orthodox anatomy. Movement and energy-balancing forms include: Polarity Yoga, Sotai, Taoist Self-Massage, Polarity and Reiki. The theoretical component includes a discussion of Eastern movement and health traditions, energy models, and cosmologies. Movement, meditation, energy-balancing and breathing will also be used as tools for self-exploration, mindfulness and integration of the theoretical material. (2cr) 

KI 1510 (SM 1510) Introduction to Sport and Recreation Management

This introductory-level course in designed as an overview of the theoretical disciplines and professions in sports and recreation management. It is recommended that students majoring in Sports and Recreation Management take this course during their first year. This course will orient students with the opportunities in management, administration, supervision and leadership in private, public, commercial and other settings in sports, recreation and leisure industries. This course is an elective for the Kinesiology major. 

KI 2010 First Aid/CPR/AED

This course focuses on procedures for basic first aid skills, cardiopulmonary resuscitation , and use of the AED (automated external defibrillators). Topics include prevention, treatment, and recognition of injuries, as well as dealing with cardiovascular and respiratory emergencies and notifying EMS. Use of the AED will be introduced. Practical hands-on work is required in the course, as well as both a written and practical exam. Students may choose to pursue external certification through the American Red Cross. This course is provided as a service course to students outside of the kinesiology major. Offered every semester or based on sufficient demand. (1cr)

KI 2020 Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) for the Professional Rescuer

This required core course for kinesiology majors provides instruction and practice in procedures for cardiopulmonary resuscitation and use of the AED (automatic external defibrillator). Topics include prevention, treatment, and recognition of injuries, as well as dealing with cardiovascular and respiratory emergencies and notifying EMS. Instruction and practical training in the use of the AED will be included. This course is particularly relevant for related student work in coaching, recreation, fitness training, and physical education. Practical hands-on training is required during the course, as well as both a written and practical exam. Students may choose to pursue external certification through the American Red Cross. Offered every semester. (1cr) 

KI 2110 Basic Care and Prevention of Injuries

An introductory course for the prospective physical educator, coach, personal trainer, physical therapist or athletic trainer designed to provide an understanding of the role of athletic training in various sports settings. Specific domains of athletic training are discussed, predominantly those of prevention, recognition and treatment of athletic injuries. Essential anatomy is reviewed as it applies to injury mechanisms. Basic evaluation and rehabilitation skills are illustrated and practiced in the required lab section, as well as basic bandaging, taping and emergency care procedures. Offered every spring. 

KI 2112 Creative Movement Instruction: Rhythms and Gymnastics

This skills-based course provides instruction and application in pedagogical principles related to physical movement instruction in the fundamentals of rhythms and basic gymnastics. Particular focus is placed on the planning, teaching, demonstrating and assessing of these types of movements and skill progressions appropriate in school physical education programs. Emphasis is placed on the student’s ability to lead, facilitate, teach, demonstrate, and assess a variety of rhythmic movements, and fundamental gymnastics skills such as tumbling. Significant practice opportunities are provided to students in each course section.  Prerequisite: KI 2140 or permission of instructor. Offered every year. (2cr) 

KI 2114, 2116, 2118 Movement Instruction: Team Sports, Fitness Activities, or Lifetime Activities

These skills-based courses provide instruction and application in pedagogical principles related to physical movement instruction in a variety of settings, as well as understanding and teaching skill progressions in the specific movement activities covered in each course (team sports, fitness activities, lifetime activities).  Emphasis is placed on the student’s ability to lead, facilitate, teach, demonstrate, and assess varied skill techniques and skill progressions. Significant practice opportunities are provided to students in each course section. Kinesiology majors are required to complete a minimum of three Movement Instruction courses (one in each area: Team Sports, Fitness Activities, and Lifetime Activities). Prerequisite: KI 2140 Motor Behavior or permission of instructor. Offered every year. (2cr per section)

KI 2120 Stress Management

This course includes an overview of the nature of stress, the roles of the mind, emotions and spirit as they relate to stress, coping strategies for dealing with stress and relaxation techniques. Topics include the physiology and psychology of stress, stress and human spirituality, behavioral and cognitive strategies for dealing with stress, and physical practices to alleviate stress. Offered every fall.

KI 2130 (PS/SM 2230) Psychology of Sport and Movement 

This course involves knowledge and training of psychological skills to enhance sport performance and physical movement activity. General content areas examined include motivation, confidence, arousal, attention, personality, anxiety, coping, social influences, and psychobiological aspects as they affect participants in competitive and recreational sports, as well as fitness, exercise and wellness activities. Prerequisite: Sophomore status. Offered every spring.

KI 2140 Motor Behavior

This course provides an overview of motor development, motor learning, and motor control. Specific focus is placed on how the brain and nervous system control movement and how new movements are learned and improved. Development of fundamental movement skills as well as applications of motor control and development to teaching and coaching of movement activities will be explored. Offered every year. (2cr)

KI 2150 Fitness/Nutrition for Wellness

Fitness/Nutrition for Wellness enables students to understand and experience movement and exercise, and nutrition within the context of overall health and wellbeing, and to apply the principles of health-related fitness to their own physical activity lifestyle. Students examine the components of health-related fitness: cardio-respiratory efficiency and power, muscular strength, muscular endurance, body composition, and flexibility. When these core components of physical fitness are combined with mindful and informed eating habits, one is also able to maintain a healthy and appropriate weight and body composition. Recommendations for health-supportive physical activity, benefits of physical activity as well as strategies to become and to stay engaged with a regular movement/exercise practice are discussed. Students evaluate their own movement/exercise habits and construct their own wellness-supportive movement program. Offered every year.

KI 2420  (WS 2420) Women in Sport

This course will introduce students to the history of women in sports and will provide an avenue to gain understanding and knowledge of the significant changes that have taken place in regard to women in the athletic arena. Perceptions, attitudes, and the roles of women have been in constant change throughout history, and in this class students will learn how “sport” has had a dramatic impact on this constant change. Prerequisite: sophomore status.  

KI 2750 (SM 2750) Organization and Administration of Sport and Recreation

Designed to provide the student with an overview of theoretical and practical components of administration in various sport, athletic, and recreation venues. Utilizing case studies, guest speakers and current research, the student will analyze organizations including interscholastic and intercollegiate programs, conferences and other sport organizations. Students will also participate in simulated or actual athletic operations as part of the course requirements. Prerequisite: KI/SM 1510 and sophomore status. Offered every fall.

KI 3120 (SM 3120) Sport in the Global Society 

This course explores the ways in which sport both reflects and shapes culture around the world. It examines the extent to which sport reinforces and/or resists dominant values both in the United States and around the world. We will briefly examine the history of modern sport, as well as social theories used to analyze sport. We will explore the connections and controversies surrounding youth, high school, intercollegiate, professional, and international sports, violence, politics, gender, race, religion, and media relations in sport and society. The overall goal of this course is to assist students in a cultural and social context, and to illustrate how sport and society both influence and challenge the human conditions. This course also counts as a LAS 7 requirement in the Liberal Core Curriculum (LCC). Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of instructor. Offered every fall. 

KI 3140 Sports Nutrition

This course gives an overview of the interaction between nutrition and exercise concepts and applications. General topics include: macronutrients and micronutrients, energy systems and optimum nutrition for exercise, nutritional and pharmacological aids to performance. Students wanting a more general exploration of nutrition should also take BI 1110 – Foundations of Nutrition. Prerequisites: BI 1030 or BI 2030, KI 2150, or permission of instructor. Offered every fall. (2cr)

KI 3150 Fitness Programming and Assessment

This course addresses the interaction of basic foundation courses such as anatomy, physiology, biomechanics, wellness, and nutrition, in order to develop effective and developmentally appropriate exercise programs for various populations. The process of evaluating, creating, and implementing exercise programs will be the focus of this course, which will include both theoretical investigation, as well as experiential work in leading and assessing fitness activities and exercise programs. Students interested in personal training as a possible career path will benefit from this course. Prerequisites: BI 1030 or BI 2030, KI 2140, KI4410 or permission of instructor. Offered every spring. 

KI 3180 Biomechanics

This course provides a combined theoretical and practical experience in the application of the mechanical principles of movement. Students explore and apply the mechanical principles of physics to human movement. Particular attention is given to how one develops efficiency in various movements and to the mechanical principles for instruction of physical motor skills. The focus is on the applied science as it relates to the teaching, coaching, and training of various physical skills and activities. Students will participate in the scientific analysis of movement. The course integrates athletic and health-fitness perspectives on movement training and enables students to critique and design appropriate movement skill progressions for sport or exercise. A thorough understanding and background in anatomy is essential for successful integration into this course content. Prerequisite: BI 1030, BI 2030, or permission of instructor. Offered every spring.

KI 3190 Adaptive Physical Activity

This course provides an understanding of the most common mental and physical disabilities found in the general population and in school systems. Special focus is placed on integrating individuals with disabilities into various physical activity settings, including physical education, fitness, recreation, and adaptive competitive sports. This course is a combination of classroom and practical experience with strong emphasis on the experiential component. Prerequisite: KI 1110 or SM 1510. *Physical Education majors are also required to complete ED 2170 – Introduction to Special Education as a prerequisite to this course. Offered every fall. 

KI 3510 World Medicine

This course examines the conceptual frameworks of major healing systems from around the world, some of which are ancient and some of which are contemporary. These systems include the following: Chinese Medicine, Ayurvedic Medicine, Greek Medicine, Homeopathy, Naturopathy, and Conventional Modern Medicine. We will explore the philosophies of these systems as they relate to the body, illness, disease, health and healing. Prerequisites: junior standing. Offered every other year.            

KI 3610 (OL/SM 3610) Theory of Outdoor Leadership

This class examines the theoretical basis of experiential education and its educational, psychological, and historical underpinnings. Emphasis is given to the development of each student’s philosophy of leadership and education; the philosophies of major outdoor programs and influential leaders in the field are discussed. Successful completion of this class prepares a student to design and lead experiential educational activities. This course is an elective for Kinesiology majors. Prerequisite: sophomore status.

KI 3720 Coaching Education Seminar

Coaching certification is a crucial issue in today’s sport education arena. This course will provide a comprehensive training for students interested in coaching from the youth to college levels. The content will focus on multiple aspects of coaching including physical training, sport psychology, risk management and legal liabilities, administrative roles within coaching, teaching technical and tactical skills, and ethics related to coaching. The required materials cover coaching competencies included in national certification coaching programs, such as the “American Sport Education Program” (ASEP). This course is required for students who select the Concentration in Coaching Education, and is also required for the Minor in Coaching. Prerequisite: Sophomore status or permission of instructor. Offered every other fall. 

KI 3990 Topics in Kinesiology

Examination of selected topics in kinesiology. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor required. May be repeated for credit with different topic. Offered upon sufficient demand. Variable credit (1-4). 

KI 4000 Senior Seminar in Kinesiology     

This capstone course prepares students for the challenges and responsibilities of professional practice in the fields within Kinesiology. Interdisciplinary research, ethics, leadership, current controversies, challenges and trends in the fields, and exploration of career planning and skill development for transitioning from the student to the professional are the major topics included. A senior research project highlights this capstone experience. It is recommended that majors also participate in KI 4850 – Practicum in Kinesiology concurrently with this seminar. Prerequisites: Senior standing, completion of a significant number of the core courses, or permission of instructor. Open to Kinesiology majors only. Offered every spring. (2cr) 

KI 4410 Exercise Physiology

Students explore the physiological principles related to the development of strength, flexibility and endurance and learn how to most efficiently condition the human body for physical activity. The course integrates athletic, occupational and health-fitness perspectives on training and enables students to critique and design training or exercise programs for varied populations. Students will participate in lab-based activities, designed to illustrate key concepts and provide practice in applying techniques, which integrate exercise physiology principles in simulated and variable movement activities. Prerequisites: BI 1030 or BI 2030, junior status, or permission of instructor. Offered every fall.   

KI 4710 (SM 4710) Legal Issues in Sport and Recreation

This class will familiarize students with basic legal concepts and relevant legal issues pertaining to athletics, sports, physical education, and recreation activities. We will focus on negligence within activity itself and with equipment, facilities, supervision, and employees, with the ultimate objective of minimizing and managing legal risks within the industry. Additionally, diverse legal issues will be covered such as contracts, standards of practice, arbitration, emergency care, and products liability. Lectures, readings, court decision analysis, and discussions are used in this class. This course is recommended to students who select the Concentration in Coaching Education, and is also required for the Minor in Coaching. Prerequisite: Junior status. Offered every spring.

KI 4810 Directed Study in Kinesiology

Contract required. Variable credit (1-4). 

KI 4830 Independent Study in Kinesiology

Contract required. Variable credit (1-4). 

KI 4850 Practicum in Kinesiology

The practicum is designed to offer insight and experiential learning in a student’s area of interest. Students are assigned to actively participate and assist in a specific setting, which might include coaching, recreation and intramural programs, fitness center instruction or management, event management, physical activity instruction, athletic training, or other related areas in sport, wellness, and physical activity. Students taking this course should have completed most of the core course work in kinesiology and have taken some credits in their area of concentration. Students are encouraged to work with the advisor to determine the appropriate experiential opportunity which is consistent with the student’s goals and interests. Prerequisite: Junior status or permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit with a varying site experience. Variable credit (1-4). 

KI 4910 Internship in Kinesiology

Contract required. Variable credit (1-15).