Chabot, Heather Frasier - New England College
Contact Us Calendar Campus Map
Accepted Students Parents and Families Alumni Students, Faculty & Staff

Chabot, Heather Frasier

Professor, Psychology

Phone: 603.428.2451

Heather Chabot

Degrees, Certifications

PhD Psychology, University of New Hampshire
MST College Teaching, University of New Hampshire
MS Psychology, University of New Hampshire
MS Sport Studies, Miami University
BA Biology, Colby College

Professional Background, Scholarship Highlights

Regularly attend and present with students at two annual psychological research conferences, the National Association for Psychological Science (APS) and the New Hampshire Psychological Association (NHPA).

Service to Country, Community

In my local community, I have served as a Board Member for the White Mountain Youth Hockey Association as well as the Voices Against Violence Task Force. I coach youth soccer and deliver lunches during the summer to children who quality for free or reduced lunches.

Personal Interests

  • As a psychologist, the foundation of my teaching philosophy is the pursuit of understanding human behavior; humans want to know why and how people act as they do. As a professor, my task is to kindle students’ innate inquisitiveness and provide opportunities to learn about themselves and others. As an academic scientist, I train students to utilize and mature their observation and reasoning skills to generate sound answers to their questions and move from opinion-based knowledge. I share my passion for exploration and understanding by using the scientific method and providing a supportive and challenging environment for student inquiry and growth.
  • We provide our students numerous opportunities for growth. We do not “weed out” students; we provide a nurturing environment where students can take root and flourish as we help them harness and focus their energy. We provide a strong safety net that allows students to move beyond their comfort zone and accept challenges to engage and better understanding themselves and others. Through challenge, encouragement, and support, our students mature and become self-directed.
  • I am especially proud of one of our recent psychology graduates. In her application essay, she wrote that many people had written her off as one of the millions of people not going anywhere or doing anything with their lives. She was a high school dropout and had a baby. NEC accepted and embraced her as a passionate young woman. She was motivated to prove others wrong. We provided an environment where her intelligence - that others had not seen - could be tested. We were able to help her channel rebellious energy and challenge herself to be successful for her own satisfaction. She is one example of how we take risks on students who others would not accept.  We see many of our students as “diamonds in the rough” who we help make shine.  She was so successful that she received our Psychology Student of the Year and graduated with honors.
  • I was a collegiate athlete and I competed at the national level.
  • In my classes I engage students to think about personal, societal, and environmental challenges. I strive to make them think about how they can become civically engaged to address these issues. Students often express that they feel powerless to effect change. In an attempt to modify their perspective, I share stories of individuals who have overcome immense physical and psychological personal and situational obstacles. I share these stories as models of courage and action, in the face of adversity and danger, to encourage students and enhance their self-efficacy. My hope is that they come to believe that they can have more of an impact than they had previously believed.