Contact Us Calendar Campus Map
Accepted Students Parents and Families Alumni Students, Faculty & Staff

CCAF GEM Program

Military Home | Marines | CDET | MARSOC | JSOU

Apply

In keeping with our long history of supporting the military, New England College is excited to have partnered with the Community College of the Air Force (CCAF) to offer the General Education Mobile (GEM) Program.

This program assists CCAF students in fulfilling their general education requirements (15 semester hour credits) toward an Associate’s Degree in Applied Science.

New England College offers convenient, online classes with online academic support through SMART Thinking, in the following five CCAF GEM subject areas:

  • Oral Communication
  • Written Communication
  • Mathematics
  • Social Science
  • Humanities

Tuition and Course Credit

Tuition is $187.50 per credit and all courses are four (4) credits. Each course is seven (7) weeks.

Apply Today

To apply, please click here.

Course Options

Oral Communication
CO 1110 – Oral Communication

Written Communication

WR 1010 – Writing in the Liberal Arts and Sciences I
WR 1020 – Writing in the Liberal Arts and Sciences II

Math
MT 1020 – College Algebra
MT 1100 – Quantitative Reasoning

Social Sciences
PS 1000 – Overcoming Prejudice and Discrimination
PS 1110 – Introduction to Psychology
SO 1110 – Introduction to Sociology

Humanities
PL 1100 – Making Sense of the World: Philosophy, Literature and Democracy
EN 1930 – Survey of American Literature

Course Descriptions

Oral Communication

CO 1110 – Oral Communication

This course introduces students to the theories and principles of oral communication by focusing on effective public speaking and listening. Students learn to select and research topics, organize information, choose appropriate oral and nonverbal language, and orally present ideas to classmates.

Written Communication

WR 1010 – Writing in the Liberal Arts and Sciences I

The goals of this course are, first, to develop the students’ critical and analytical thinking skills in the context of a sound rhetorical approach to written communication; and, second, to instill a fundamental sensitivity to and facility with language. Areas of study include the nature of the writing process, situation and audience, problem definition, invention techniques, thesis statements, organization, drafting, revisions, and the fundamentals of editing. Assignments follow thematic sequences leading students from experience‐based, issue-oriented arguments to the essentials of formal academic research. This course is offered every semester and is required of all students to meet institutional graduation requirements.

WR 1020 – Writing in the Liberal Arts and Sciences II

The goal of this course is to teach academic research as a tool for critical thinking that provides the basis for well-developed arguments. This course requires synthesis, analysis, and application of information through writing in a variety of rhetorical forms for a variety of audiences. Students are asked to research and discuss a variety of social issues through the use of selected readings from modern essayists and the available library resources. This course is offered every semester and is required of all students to meet institutional graduation requirements. Writing in the Liberal Arts and Sciences I. Students must earn a grade of C or better to fulfill the College Writing requirement.

Math

MT 1020 – College Algebra

This course is designed for students who need additional preparation for MT 1510 (Pre‐calculus). The course will focus on the application of algebra to real world problems including introductory algebra topics such as: factoring polynomials, solving quadratic equations, graphing linear, quadratic, and other polynomial functions, rational functions, and solving systems of equations. Emphasis will be on conceptual understanding, learning in context, and solving real world problems using graphical, symbolic, and numeric representations.

MT 1100 – Quantitative Reasoning

The goal of this course is to develop students’ ability to think critically about quantitative statements and information. In this course, students will have opportunities to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of numerical evidence and logical arguments, to apply mathematical methods in the context of real-world problems, and to study and employ strategies and methods for how to manipulate, understand, analyze, and interpret quantitative information. Students who do not need to take a higher level mathematics course should find this an interesting way of meeting the Quantitive Literacy requirement. Students who do not need to take a higher level mathematics course should find this an interesting way of meeting the Quantitative Literacy requirement.

Social Sciences

PS 1000 – Overcoming Prejudice and Discrimination

In overcoming Prejudice and Discrimination, we will examine the forces that promote unity, theories and concepts related to prejudice and discrimination, and specific strategies to reduce conflict and promote respect and understanding among diverse populations. This course was created as a collaborative effort of faculty in criminal justice, education, kinesiology, psychology, and sociology, and has a strong applied (project‐based) component.

PS 1110 – Introduction to Psychology

A survey course in the fundamentals of psychology. A wide range of topics are covered such as the biological bases of behavior, learning, motivation, human development across the lifespan, emotion, cognition, intelligence, personality, social interaction, abnormal behavior, methods of therapy, and stress and adjustment.

SO 1110 – Introduction to Sociology

This course introduces students to the dynamic and varied discipline of sociology. It provides an overview of major concepts, perspectives, and methods used in sociological inquiry. Students are encouraged to look at society and its institutions in new ways, and to identify and challenge social injustice.

Humanities

PL 1100 – Making Sense of the World: Philosophy, Literature and Democracy

With today’s emphasis on scientific and technological knowledge, it is often easy to neglect or even dismiss the vital role of the humanities in helping us to interpret and understand the experiences that define the human condition by providing us with a context for ethical and moral reflection and deliberation.

With a focus on two key areas within the humanities, philosophy and literature, this course examines one of the most important struggles in the course of human development and history: the struggle to achieve a more just society and world. Bringing together works from both disciplines, readings will chart the development of our democratic ideals, demonstrating the role of philosophy and literature in shaping our most important ideas of human dignity and justice.

EN 1930 – Survey of American Literature

A survey of the works of major writers of literature and literary movements in America. Beginning with Native American voices, this course will progress through the 18th and 19th centuries to modern times. Though this course focuses on the major writers and movements, it does not ignore the importance of some unrecognized voices that have shaped American literature.

Your New England College POC

Sarah White
Executive Director of Enrollment, School of Graduate and Professional Studies
603.428.2906
swhite@nec.edu